Cooking and Booking IV

Although I’ve already checked off my 30 books and 30 recipes before turning 30, I am keeping up my “cooking and booking” post series, as a way to easily find these recipes when I want to make them again, and because who can’t use more book and food recs? One slight change: Rather than logging ALL the new recipes I try out, I am only going to post recipes that were good enough that I have made them multiple times or plan to do so. Any recipe below has my hearty recommendation! As for the books, I am continuing to list all of the books I read with no particular rating or recommendation, just a tl;dr book summary in parentheses. Enjoy!

Here are the recipes! The first three I made for a tapas party.

31. Easy Spicy Pork Meatballs, from Pinch and Swirl

32. Gambas Al Ajillo, from Genius Kitchen

33. Chickpea and Spinach Stew, from Food & Wine

34. Easy Slow Cooker Pulled Pork, from Chowhound

35. Orzo with Roasted Vegetables, from Food Network

… and the books!

31. Beth Kobliner, Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties. (Want to adult like a pro? Get this book.)

32. Daniel Branch, Kenya: Between Hope and Despair, 1963-2011. (Postcolonial Kenyan history. Title sounds overly dramatic and pessimistic, but I recommend it.)

33. Markus Zusak, The Book Thief. (WWII historical fiction. Probably my second favorite in that category, after All the Light We Cannot See.)

34. Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy. (Nonfiction/memoir. Young lawyer helps free an innocent man from death row in Alabama and highlights the injustices in our justice system.)

35. Emma Straub, The Vacationers. (A book for the beach. Or a book for the winter when you hate winter and wish you were at the beach.)

 

For more recipes and books, see Cooking and Booking III.

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A Winter Weekend in Savannah

Savannah, Georgia might seem like a random destination for a New Englander, but after a recent girls’ trip there, I am definitely a fan of this quiet, charming Southern city for a winter weekend getaway. Our original motivations for picking Savannah were that it was a good twenty to thirty degrees warmer than Boston and it was relatively inexpensive to get there. We stayed in the historic district, which was a lovely area, and found that there were plenty of things to do within walking distance of our hotel. Savannah reminded me a lot of Charleston, with its historic buildings and Spanish moss, but a smaller, calmer version of Charleston. Pictures and recommendations below!

Left: Forsyth Park and its famous fountain. We also enjoyed the Saturday morning farmers’ market there! Right: “City Market,” several blocks lined with shops and restaurants.

Rooftop river views at Top Deck

Southbound Brewing Company

Flounder and fried chicken (in seriously large portions) at the Olde Pink House Restaurant. The food was amazing and the historic mansion ambiance was pretty fantastic too.

All in all, not a bad destination for a girls’ weekend away!

Cooking and Booking III

Well, I can officially check goals #9 AND 10 off my 30 before 30 list! Since making the list, I have cooked 30+ new recipes and read 30+ new books.

I’ve already listed 30 recipes in previous blog posts, but here are a few additional recipes that I’ve recently discovered and fallen in love with. These are seriously good and have officially made it into my regular recipe rotation!

 

And now for the books:

21. Fredrik Backman, A Man Called Ove. (Lonely, grumpy old man finds joy and a reason to go on living. Will seriously warm your heart.)

22. Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See. (My favorite book in the gigantic category that is WWII fiction.)

23. Brock Clarke, An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England. (Comments on the back claimed this book was “funny” so I feel like I should warn you that it was actually a lot darker than I expected.)

24. Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train. (Dark psychological thriller. Reminded me a lot of Gone Girl.)

25. Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. (A young woman’s mental breakdown. Probably semi-autobiographical. Definitely brilliantly written.)

26. J. D. Vance, Hillbilly Elegy. (Memoir. Reflections on growing up in rural white working-class America.)

27. Paul Fleischman, Seedfolks. (A community garden brings a neighborhood together. Kid lit, but I think every adult should read this one too.)

28. Garth Stein, How Evan Broke His Head. (Father reunited with long-lost teenage son. Coming to terms with secrets he’s kept inside for years.)

29. Sarah Gruen, Water For Elephants. (Drama and intrigue in an early 20th century American traveling circus.)

30. Kennedy Odede and Jessica Posner, Find Me Unafraid. (Nonfiction/Memoir. Overcoming adversity and working for social justice and community empowerment in Kibera.)

And a bonus: The book I’m currently reading, which by the way I highly recommend to anyone and everyone in my (millennial) life stage…

31. Beth Kobliner, Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties And Thirties. (Title says it all.)

 

Check out Cooking and Booking I and Cooking and Booking II for more recipes and books, and My 30 Before 30 List for the idea behind these posts.

What to eat in Barbados?!

The hubs and I took a trip to Barbados this summer, thanks to an incredibly cheap ticket (shoutout, secretflying.com) and the fact that neither of us needed a visa to go there. More pictures coming soon, but for starters, I absolutely have to do a food post. We ate very well in Barbados, and managed to keep most of our meals in the $5-$10 per person range. Food can be surprisingly expensive in Barbados, so if you’re traveling on a budget, definitely check out these places! And let me know if you’re planning a trip there and looking for a place to stay, because I would 1000% recommend our airbnb host. The majority of these food recs came from him. Foods we tried for the first time on this trip included marlin, dolphin, flying fish, breadfruit, macaroni pie, ackee, and coucou.

Tender, savory ribs at a rum shop called Kermitt’s Bar, where everything is painted green, from the walls to the tables to the pickup truck:

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Ackee fruit from a roadside vendor:

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Fresh fried marlin and breadfruit near Bridgetown at Baxter’s Road, which used to be the hot fish fry spot before Oistins. The fish here was cheaper and in my opinion possibly even better than Oistins!

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For a mid-afternoon coffee and dessert pick-me-up, Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary has a cafe with lovely outdoor seating, boasting beautiful views and some overly friendly ducks.

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Cuz’s Fish Shack on Pebbles Beach is the place to go for delicious fish cutters (sandwiches). The perfect beach lunch! We went back for seconds!

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In St. Lawrence Gap, we found opportunities to take in gorgeous ocean views while sampling Barbados’ own Mount Gay rum in the form of drinks you can really only ever order at the beach.

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And around sunset in St. Lawrence Gap, grills and red umbrellas suddenly appear, and you can get an amazingly delicious “gap burger” for $5, grilled for you right there. We’ve since tried to recreate this burger on our own grill back home!

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While strolling around St. Lawrence Gap in the evening, we wandered into this jazz bar, Scoopie’s, drawn in by the sound of live music. We loved it! Definitely recommend.

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The fish shacks at Oistins are of course a must. We had dolphin at Mo’s. Sadly, we left on a Friday morning and missed the famous Friday night fish fry, when Oistins gets much more crowded and lively, so I hear. I guess we’ll just have to come back!

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Sharing the Bajan herb chicken, a salad, and macaroni pie at BBQ Barn in Rockley:

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We started our mornings with egg cutters on Bajan salt bread, followed by walks to The Coffee Bean, a coffee shop with this lovely view just outside:

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And finally, coucou and stew just before heading to the airport:

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We had flying fish cutters at the airport before boarding our flight. Not the best flying fish I’m sure, but they were yummy and we couldn’t leave Barbados without trying flying fish at least once, even if it was out of season!